TIPS TO CHOOSE A BEST WASHING MACHINE

Laundering by hand involves soaking, beating, scrubbing, and rinsing dirty textiles. Before indoor plumbing, individuals also had to carry all the water used for washing, boiling and rinsing the laundry from a pump. Water for the laundry would be hand-carried, heated on a fire for washing, then poured into the tub. That made the warm soapy water precious; it would be reused, first to wash the least soiled clothing, then to wash progressively dirtier laundry. Removal of soap and water from the clothing after washing was a separate process. First, soap would be rinsed out with clear water. After rinsing, the soaking wet clothing would be formed into a roll and twisted by hand to extract water. The entire process often occupied an entire day of hard work, plus drying and ironing. To overcome all these difficulties and to make it easier, washing machine were invented.


Features to look for when you’re buying a new washing machine

  • RPM. The higher the RPM, the faster it rotates to remove water from clothes.
  • Fuzzy logic. This feature automatically manages wash cycle, water temperature, spin and rinse speed.
  • Quick wash.
  • Bubble wash.
  • Temperature control.
  • LCD/LED Display.
  • Time delay.

Here are some of the best washing machine with the above best features

  1. IFB 6.5 Kg 5 Star Fully-Automatic Front Loading Washing Machine

2. LG 6.5 Kg 5 Star Smart Inverter Fully-Automatic Top Loading Washing Machine

3. Bosch 6.5 kg 5 Star Top Loader Washing Machine 

4. Samsung 7.0 Kg Inverter 5 star Semi-Automatic Washing Machine

5. Whirlpool 7 Kg 5 Star Royal Plus Fully-Automatic Top Loading Washing Machine

Types of Washing machine

*Top-Loading washing machine

The top-loading, vertical axis cloth washer, is the dominant design in the United States and Canada. This design places the clothes in a vertically mounted perforated basket that is contained within a water-retaining tub, with a finned water-pumping agitator in the centre of the bottom of the basket. Clothes are loaded through the top of the machine, which is usually but not always covered with a hinged door.

During the wash cycle, the outer tub is filled with water sufficient to fully immerse and suspend the clothing freely in the basket. The movement of the agitator pushes water outward between the paddles towards the edge of the tub. The water then moves outward, up the sides of the basket, towards the centre, and then down towards the agitator to repeat the process, in a circulation pattern similar to the shape of a torus.

The agitator direction is periodically reversed because continuous motion in one direction would just lead to the water spinning around the basket with the agitator rather than the water being pumped in the torus-shaped motion. Some washers supplement the water-pumping action of the agitator with a large rotating screw on the shaft above the agitator, to help move water downwards in the centre of the basket.

Since the agitator and the drum are separate and distinct in a top-loading washing machine, the mechanism of a top-loader is inherently more complicated than a front-loading machine. Manufacturers have devised several ways to control the motion of the agitator during the wash and rinse separately from the high-speed rotation of the drum required for the spin cycle.

While a top-loading washing machine could use a universal motor or DC brushless motor, it is conventional for top-loading washing machines to use more expensive, heavy, and more electrically efficient and reliable induction motors.  The action of a front-loading washing machine is better suited to a motor capable of reversing direction with every reversal of the wash basket; a universal motor is noisier, less efficient, doesn’t last as long, but is better suited to the task of reversing direction every few seconds.

An alternative to the oscillating agitator design is the impeller type washtub pioneered by Hoover on its long-running Hoovermatic series of top-loading machines. Here, an impeller (trademarked by Hoover as a “Pulsator”) mounted on the side of the tub spins in a constant direction and creates a fast-moving current of water in the tub which drags the clothes through the water along a toroidal path. The impeller design has the advantage of its mechanical simplicity – a single-speed motor with belt drive is all that is required to drive the Pulsator with no need for gearboxes or complex electrical controls, but has the disadvantage of lower load capacity in relation to tub size. Hoovermatic machines were made mostly in twin tub format for the European market – (where they competed with Hotpoint’s Supermatic line which used the oscillating agitator design) until the early 1990s. Some industrial garment testing machines still use the Hoover wash action.

The many different ways different manufacturers have solved the same problem over the years is a good example of many different ways to solve the same engineering problem with different goals, different manufacturing capabilities and expertise, and different patent encumbrances.

*Front-Loading washing machine

The front-loading or horizontal-axis clothes washer is the dominant design in Europe. In other regions of the world, most “high-end” washing machines are of this type. In addition, most commercial and industrial clothes washers around the world are of the horizontal-axis design.

This layout mounts the inner basket and outer tub horizontally, and loading is through a door at the front of the machine. The door often but not always contains a transparent window. Agitation is supplied by the back-and-forth rotation of the cylinder and by gravity. The clothes are lifted up by paddles on the inside wall of the drum and then dropped. This motion flexes the weave of the fabric and forces water and detergent solution through the clothes load. Because the wash action does not require the clothing to be freely suspended in water, only enough water is needed to moisten the fabric. Because less water is required, front-loaders typically use less soap, and the repeated dropping and folding action of the tumbling can easily produce large amounts of foam or suds.

Front-loaders control water usage through the surface tension of water, and the capillary wicking action this creates in the fabric weave. A front-loader washer always fills to the same low water level, but a large pile of dry clothing standing in water will soak up the moisture, causing the water level to drop. The washer then refills to maintain the original water level. Because it takes time for this water absorption to occur with a motionless pile of fabric, nearly all front-loaders begin the washing process by slowly tumbling the clothing under the stream of water entering and filling the drum, to rapidly saturate the clothes with water.

Front-loading washers are mechanically simple compared to top-loaders, with the main motor (a universal motor or variable frequency drive motor) normally being connected to the drum via a grooved pulley belt and large pulley wheel, without the need for a gearbox, clutch or crank. Some models, such as those by LG, utilize a motor directly connected to the drum, eliminating the need for a belt and pulley. But front-load washers suffer from their own technical problems, due to the drum lying sideways. For example, a top-loading washer keeps water inside the tub merely through the force of gravity pulling down on the water, while a front-loader must tightly seal the door shut with a gasket to prevent water dripping onto the floor during the wash cycle. This access door is locked shut with an interlocking device during the entire wash cycle since opening the door with the machine in use could result in water gushing out onto the floor. In most machines, the interlock is usually doubly redundant to prevent either opening with the drum full of water or being opened during the spin cycle. For front-loaders without viewing windows on the door, it is possible to accidentally pinch the fabric between the door and the drum, resulting in tearing and damage to the pinched clothing during tumbling and spinning.

Nearly all front-loader washers for the consumer market also use a folded flexible bellows assembly around the door opening, to keep clothing contained inside the basket during the tumbling wash cycle. If this bellows assembly were not used, small articles of clothing such as socks could slip out of the wash basket near the door, and fall down the narrow slot between the outer tub and basket, plugging the drain and possibly jamming rotation of the inner basket. Retrieving lost items from between the outer tub and inner basket can require complete disassembly of the front of the washer and pulling out the entire inner wash basket. Commercial and industrial front-loaders used by businesses (described below) usually do not use the bellows, and instead, require all small objects to be placed in a mesh bag to prevent loss near the basket opening.

The bellows assembly around the door is a potential source of problems for the consumer front-loader. The bellows have a large number of flexible folds to permit the tub to move separately from the door during the high-speed extraction cycle. On many machines, these folds can collect lint, dirt, and moisture, resulting in mould and mildew growth, and a foul odour. Some front-loading washer operating instructions say the bellows should be wiped down monthly with a strong bleach solution, while others offer a special “freshening” cycle where the machine is run empty with a strong dosing of bleach.

The inherent mechanical weak spot of the front loader design is the cantilevered mounting of the inner drum within the outer tub. The drum bearing has to support the entire weight of the drum, the laundry, and the dynamic loads created by the sloshing of the water and of the imbalance of the load during the spin cycle. The drum bearing eventually wears out and usually requires the extensive dismantling of the machine to replace, which often results in the machine being written off due to the failure of a relatively inexpensive component that is labour-intensive to renew. Some manufacturers have compounded this problem by “overmolding” the drum bearing into the outer tub to reduce manufacturing costs, but this makes the bearing impossible to renew without replacing the entire outer tub – which usually forces owners to scrap the entire machine – this may be viewed as an implementation of built-in obsolescence.

Compared to top-loading washers, clothing can be packed more tightly in a front loader, up to the full drum volume if using a cotton wash cycle. This is because wet cloth usually fits into a smaller space than dry cloth, and front loaders are able to self-regulate the water needed to achieve correct washing and rinsing. Extreme overloading of front-loading washers pushes fabrics towards the small gap between the loading door and the front of the wash basket, potentially resulting in fabrics lost between the basket and outer tub, and in severe cases, tearing of clothing and jamming the motion of the basket.

Front Loading VS Top Loading

  • Efficient cleaning: Front-loaders usually use less energy, water, and detergent compared to the best top-loaders. High efficiency washers use 20% to 60% of the detergent, water and energy of standard” washers. They usually take somewhat longer (20–110 minutes) to wash a load, but are often computer controlled with additional sensors, to adapt the wash cycle to the needs of each load.
  • Water usage: Front-loaders usually use less water than top-loading residential clothes washers. Estimates are that front-loaders use from one third to one half as much water as top-loaders.
  • Spin-dry effectiveness: Front-loaders (and European horizontal axis top loaders and some front loaders) offer much higher maximum spin speeds of up to 2000 RPM , although home machines tend to be in 1000 to 1400  RPM range, while top-loaders (with agitators) do not exceed 1140  RPM. High-efficiency top-loaders with a wash plate (instead of an agitator) can spin up to 1100 RPM, as their center of gravity is lower. Higher spin speeds, along with the diameter of the drum, determine the g-force , and a higher g-force removes more residual water, making clothes dry faster. This also reduces energy consumption if clothes are dried in a clothes dryer. 
  • Cycle length: Top loaders have tended to have shorter cycle times, in part because their design has traditionally emphasized simplicity and speed of operation more than resource conservation. It is observed that Top Loaders washes the clothes in half the time as compared to a front load washing machine.
  • Wear and abrasion: Top-loaders require an agitator or impeller mechanism to force enough water through clothes to clean them effectively, which greatly increases mechanical wear and tear on fabrics. Front-loaders use paddles in the drum to repeatedly pick up and drop clothes into the water for cleaning; this gentler action causes less wear and tear. The number of clothes wear can be roughly gauged by the amount of accumulation in a clothes dryer lint  filter, since the lint largely consists of stray fibers detached from textiles during washing and drying.
  • Difficult items: Top-loaders may have trouble cleaning large items, such as sleeping bags or pillows, which tend to float on top of the wash water rather than circulate within it. In addition, vigorous top-loader agitator motions may damage delicate fabrics. Whereas in a Front Load washing machine one can easily wash pillows, shoes, soft toys, and other difficult to wash items.
  • Noise: Front-loaders tend to operate more quietly than top-loaders because the door seal helps contain noise, and because there is less of a tendency to imbalance. Top-loaders usually need a mechanical transmission  (due to agitators, see above), which can generate more noise than the rubber belt or direct drive found in most front loaders.

Parts of a Washer

Since each washing machine comes with its own design and features, some of the parts will vary between your machine. But get to know your washer with some common parts you can find in your machine.

  • Water pump.This circulates the water through the machine, rotating in two directions. It’s used for circulating the water through the wash cycle and also for draining the water during the spin cycle.
  • Water inlet control valve. This is located near the water inlet point, which is opens and closes automatically when you load the clothes, depending on how much water is required.
  • Drum. Did you know that washing machines actually have two tubs? The one you see where the clothes are loaded is the inner drum, which moves around the washing machine and is perforated with holes to allow the water in and out. The outer tub contains the inner drum and the water, stopping it from leaking into the rest of the machine and supports the inner drum.
  • Agitator or paddles. This is located inside the tub of the washing machine and helps perform the cleaning of the clothes. Most fully-automatic washing machines have these paddles on the rotating inner drum which is controlled by a rotating disc, whereas semi-automatic washing machines use an agitator that rotates within the machine to produce a current in the machine. Either way, these are designed to move the clothes around during the wash to allow the detergent to work and remove dirt particles and soiling from your clothes, helping the clothes rub together while washing.
  • Washing machine motor. This is combined with the agitator or the disc that turns the drum, it produces a rotator motion. This is basically the mechanism that gets your machine going.
  • Drain pipe. All the dirty water from your washing is expelled from the machine via the drain pipe.
  • Printed circuit board (PCB). This is where you’ll find main the electronics that operate the machine from electrical components to circuits. These can be programmed and help operate the machine, acting as the artificial intelligence for the washing machine, sometimes even deciding on the time needed for rinsing or washing.
  • Timer. This helps set the wash time for your clothes, which can be set manually or automatically.
  • Heating element. This heats the water up in the washing machine to the desired temperature.

Finally, Washer technology was developed as a way to reduce the manual labour spend. The earliest machines were hand-operated and constructed from wood, while later machines were made of metal and got power from electricity. Today’s modern washing machine let people feel washing is enjoyable and leisurely.

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